Beyond the Backyard

Birdy Morning at the Orlando Mudflats

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It was my last morning of my Christmas vacation. The first sunny day in a week. I went to the Orlando Wetlands hoping for Roseate Spoonbills and a sunrise like this…

Orlando Wetlands at Dawn – Taken in 2012

But sadly, I encountered a very different sight – a mud flat! I didn’t realize that they are de-mucking one of the best cells in the wetlands as part of a wetlands renovation project. It’s valuable work that isn’t particularly photogenic…

Sunrise at the Orlando Mudflats!

There was a bright side, though. It was very easy to see the Wilson’s Snipe that were hanging out in the mudflats. Usually these timid birds are harder to find and photograph out in the open.

Wilson's Snipe
Wilson’s Snipe on Mud Flat

This Glossy Ibis certainly showed off his colors in the bright morning sun.

Glossy Ibis
Glossy Ibis on Mud Flat

My target bird of the morning was Roseate Spoonbill in flight. But most of the good birdy activity was on the side of the path looking straight into the sun. So I ended up walking some paths that I’ve never explored and enjoying the little birds who surprised me, like this Savannah Sparrow who perched so nicely out in the open.

Savannah Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow

I found a Great-crested Flycatcher who lurked in the depths of a distant tree and refused to be photographed. Then this Gray Catbird hopped out and said “meow!”

Gray Catbird
Gray Catbird

When I least expected it, a pair of Roseate Spoonbills flew in and landed in a tree. They are so pretty at this time of year in their bright pink and orange breeding colors. I stood watching them for a long time, hoping they would fly closer. They didn’t. But at least I got to see them!

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

I think I took the most pictures after I got back to my car to leave. There was a flock of American Goldfinches feeding in the tree above my car. I love their cheerful happy calls that sound like “Potato chip! Potato chip!” I love watching them hang upside down at my bird feeder, and it was fun to watch the same behaviors out in the wild.

American Goldfinch
Upside-down American Goldfinch

Beyond the Backyard

Winter Sunset over Lake Apopka

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It’s been ages since I’ve photographed a good sunset. So last week when I saw some good clouds in the western sky, I headed up to Magnolia Park to photograph the sunset over Lake Apopka. Rich came with me (smart guy, he prefers sunset photography to sunrise photography!) and we enjoyed watching the colors fade in the sky.

Sunset over Lake Apopka
Sunset over Lake Apopka

These images use High Dynamic Range (HDR) in post-processing to extend the tonal range of the image. The first image is a 3-image composite. The bottom photograph is a 7-image composite.

Sunset at Magnolia Park
Sunset at Magnolia Park

Given the cloud conditions, I was fairly happy with this last image. We left about ten minutes after sunset. But it pays to stay later, as we found out as we drove west on the way home, and found ourselves driving into a bright pink after color. It was gorgeous.

That’s the good thing about photography – there’s always something to motivate you to get out and try it again! :)

Beyond the Backyard

Gray January Morning at the Lake Apopka Wildlife Drive

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Last week I headed to the Lake Apopka Wildlife Drive (LAWD) one gray, foggy morning. I didn’t have high expectations for photography with the low light, but the wildlife drive is always a fun trip.

Purple Gallinule
Purple Gallinule

I didn’t spend much time at the Lust Gate entrance because it was too dark / foggy, and the breeze kept the little birds from posing for my camera. So as I approached the Crazy U, one of my first birds was this Purple Gallinule. Then I finally spotted a bird that I’ve been chasing at the wildlife drive for several years – the Gray-headed Swamphen. The Swamphen basically looks like a larger version of the Purple Gallinule. It is native to India and Asia, and has established a range in South Florida that apparently extends up to LAWD in the wintertime.

Gray-headed Swamphen
Gray-headed Swamphen

Although the wildlife drive is obviously intended to be traversed in a car, I find that I enjoy it best when I park and get out and walk. It’s easier to spot and photograph the little birds when I’m on foot. Like this Common Yellowthroat, who hopped out into the open briefly before flitting along in the reeds…

Common Yellowthroat (Female)
Common Yellowthroat (Female)

…or this juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron, who I might not have spotted from my car because of how well he blended into the distant reeds.

Black-crowned Night Heron (Juvenile)
Black-crowned Night Heron (Juvenile)

During one of the brief periods when the sun made an appearance, I spotted this Northern Harrier flying not too far from the Crazy U. It was tricky to hand-hold the camera while keeping the focus on the bird as he flew in front of the blowing reeds. I liked the result though. :)

Northern Harrier in Flight
Northern Harrier in Flight

The female Vermilion Flycatcher is back this winter at her same spot just south of the Crazy U. I spotted her far out in the marsh, and I won’t waste pixels posting the terrible picture that I took of her. When I turned around, though, I spotted a Green Heron stalking his breakfast in the canal. The good thing about a day with no sunshine is that you can shoot in any direction without harsh shadows. So I squatted down to the bird’s level and watched the bird catch minnow after minnow for breakfast.

Green Heron
Green Heron

My time at the Crazy U was definitely the best part of the drive that morning. A steady stream of cars kept me moving as I tried to photograph the wintering ducks on various parts of the drive. I did get this quick head shot of a Northern Shoveler who was almost right next to my car.

Northern Shoveler (Male) Head Shot
Northern Shoveler (Male) Head Shot

At the sod farms near the end of the drive, I spotted another Northern Harrier flying close. I hopped out of the car in time for the bird to fly over my head. Not a bad end to a fun morning of winter birds!

Northern Harrier Flyby
Northern Harrier Flyby